Category Archives: Regulation

One Year After Death of Net Neutrality, the Internet Still Works

On the one year anniversary of the repeal of Obama-era net neutrality rules, the internet and our access to it has not changed all that much, to the surprise of some.

Ajit Pai, the Trump-appointed chairman of the FCC, issued the Restoring Internet Freedom Order, which took effect on June 11, 2018. The order rolled back regulations which mandated that internet service providers treat all internet data equally, not varying internet speeds for different sites.

Chairman Pai’s chief justification for repealing net neutrality was his belief that the regulations hindered the economic freedom of internet companies. In explaining his position, Pai said, “my concern is that, by imposing those heavy-handed economic regulations on internet service providers big and small, we could end up disincentivizing companies from wanting to build out Internet access to a lot of parts of the country, in low-income, urban and rural areas, for example.”

Opposition to Pai’s plan to repeal net neutrality, particularly from the left, was massive and fervent. Concerned members of the public along with politicians speculated that the death of net neutrality would bring about a world in which internet costs would skyrocket, and providers would decide exactly what consumers could do online.

Democratic lawmakers despaired at Pai’s repeal of the regulations. Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.) labeled the move an “outrageous assault on an open and fair internet.” Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D., N.Y.) said the repeal “attacks freedom of speech for the millions of people who use the internet every single day.”

A year after net neutrality regulations were rolled back, though, the apocalyptic ramifications predicted by many have hardly come to pass. Data plan prices have not skyrocketed. Contentious and open debates are still taking place across the internet. The typical internet user would likely be unable to point out how their experiences online have changed since the repeal took effect.

One user on Twitter laid out some of the most alarmist reactions to net neutrality’s repeal in a thread, placed in stark contrast to the reality of the matter. He included tweets from Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.), who called the repeal an “egregious attack on democracy,” an NGO that considered it an “attack on the LGBT community,” and a Twitter user who believed people would have to use land lines again to communicate since providers would begin charging for sending messages online.

The post One Year After Death of Net Neutrality, the Internet Still Works appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

One Year After Death of Net Neutrality, the Internet Still Works

On the one year anniversary of the repeal of Obama-era net neutrality rules, the internet and our access to it has not changed all that much, to the surprise of some.

Ajit Pai, the Trump-appointed chairman of the FCC, issued the Restoring Internet Freedom Order, which took effect on June 11, 2018. The order rolled back regulations which mandated that internet service providers treat all internet data equally, not varying internet speeds for different sites.

Chairman Pai’s chief justification for repealing net neutrality was his belief that the regulations hindered the economic freedom of internet companies. In explaining his position, Pai said, “my concern is that, by imposing those heavy-handed economic regulations on internet service providers big and small, we could end up disincentivizing companies from wanting to build out Internet access to a lot of parts of the country, in low-income, urban and rural areas, for example.”

Opposition to Pai’s plan to repeal net neutrality, particularly from the left, was massive and fervent. Concerned members of the public along with politicians speculated that the death of net neutrality would bring about a world in which internet costs would skyrocket, and providers would decide exactly what consumers could do online.

Democratic lawmakers despaired at Pai’s repeal of the regulations. Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.) labeled the move an “outrageous assault on an open and fair internet.” Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D., N.Y.) said the repeal “attacks freedom of speech for the millions of people who use the internet every single day.”

A year after net neutrality regulations were rolled back, though, the apocalyptic ramifications predicted by many have hardly come to pass. Data plan prices have not skyrocketed. Contentious and open debates are still taking place across the internet. The typical internet user would likely be unable to point out how their experiences online have changed since the repeal took effect.

One user on Twitter laid out some of the most alarmist reactions to net neutrality’s repeal in a thread, placed in stark contrast to the reality of the matter. He included tweets from Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.), who called the repeal an “egregious attack on democracy,” an NGO that considered it an “attack on the LGBT community,” and a Twitter user who believed people would have to use land lines again to communicate since providers would begin charging for sending messages online.

The post One Year After Death of Net Neutrality, the Internet Still Works appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

Group of Lawmakers Introduce Package of Bills to Trim State’s 153,000 Regulations

Pennsylvania’s thousands of regulations have kept the state “closed for business,” according to a group of lawmakers and business leaders who gathered at York College Wednesday to discuss regulatory reform.

The nation’s economy is booming, but Pennsylvania is still struggling due to a regulatory environment that “has been holding us back from achieving our full potential,” said state Sen. Kristin Phillips-Hill, who led the discussion in front of the former York Narrow Fabrics Company that used to make the actual “red tape” associated with government regulations.

The state’s 153,000 regulations, some which have been on the books for decades, are the equivalent of “extreme hoarding,” said state Rep. Kate Klunk, R-York.

“We don’t get rid of anything,” Klunk said. “We need a Marie Kondo-type person to come in and start cleaning things up.”

Klunk has introduced a bill in the state House of Representatives that will establish an independent Office of the Repealer, which would examine the value of any act or regulation. The bill is being sponsored in the state Senate by Phillips-Hill.

The two lawmakers are also promoting a bill that will require every agency to repeal two regulations for every one added.

Business leaders said the regulatory environment makes the state a tough one, with some saying it’s easier to make customers happy than the government, said Carl Marrara, vice president of government affairs for the Pennsylvania Manufacturers’ Association.

“Our employers are facing an onslaught of regulations from a breadth of departments at the local, state and federal level,” Marrara said. “This great uncertainty in business planning results in companies not growing, expanding, hiring or investing as they could.”

It’s not just the amount of regulations and permits, but the time it takes to get a response. State Rep. Greg Rothman, R-Cumberland, has introduced House Bill 509 to address what he called “permit paralysis.” If passed, the bill would create a website where permits could be tracked like Amazon tracks a package, he said.

Rothman is also sponsoring House Bill 507, which requires the executive branch to bring any new regulations to the legislature, even if it’s just the committee level.

State Rep. Dawn Keefer, R-Dillsburg, is sponsoring a bill that mirrors the federal REINS Act. The bill would require the state House and the Senate to approve any regulation with an impact of $1 million or more.

“This puts the power back into the hands of the Legislative branch,” Keefer said. “This is truly what the issue is. The issue is restoring a balance of power in the Commonwealth.”

The post Group of Lawmakers Introduce Package of Bills to Trim State’s 153,000 Regulations appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

Mark Zuckerberg Proposes Regulating Political Discussion, Immigration Debate

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg proposed in an interview this week that political discussion on social media, including the immigration debate, should be regulated in an effort to crack down on foreign influence.

Jeff Landry: Big Tech Must Learn ‘No One Is Bigger than the People’

Jeff Landry, the Attorney General of Louisiana and a former congressman, encouraged government action against Big Tech companies during an appearance on SiriusXM Patriot’s Breitbart News Daily, Tuesday.

Culture Secretary: Amazon, Netflix Could Be Forced to ‘Represent Full Diversity of UK’ Like BBC

British Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Jeremy Wright appeared to threaten heavier regulation of streaming services like Amazon Prime and Netflix to “encourage” them to “reflect and represent” the “full diversity” of the United Kingdom, like the BBC.