Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen to testify before Congress in February

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney and fixer, has accepted an invitation to testify in an open session before Congress next month.

“I look forward to having the privilege of being afforded a platform with which to give a full and credible account of the events which have transpired,” Cohen said in a statement to ABC News, adding that he accepted the invitation “in furtherance of my commitment to cooperate and provide the American people with answers.”

The hearing, set for Feb. 7 before the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, was announced Thursday afternoon by Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Maryland Democrat, who is the new chairman of the committee.

In a press release, Cummings said, “I thank Michael Cohen for agreeing to testify before the Oversight Committee voluntarily. I want to make clear that we have no interest in inappropriately interfering with any ongoing criminal investigations, and to that end, we are in the process of consulting with Special Counsel Mueller’s office. The Committee will announce additional information in the coming weeks.”

Cohen was sentenced in December to three years in federal prison for financial crimes, lying to Congress, and for two violations of campaign finance law in connection with hush money payments to two women who have claimed past affairs with Trump. He is due to report to prison in early March.

In an exclusive interview after his sentencing with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos, Cohen slammed his former boss as incapable of telling the truth and faulted his own “blind loyalty” to the president for his role in the payments to the women.

 President Donald Trump speaks to the media after signing Anti-Human Trafficking Legislation in the Oval Office on Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington.

(Mark Wilson/Getty Images, FILE)  President Donald Trump speaks to the media after signing Anti-Human Trafficking Legislation in the Oval Office on Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington.

Cohen told Stephanopoulos that Trump directed him to arrange the payments to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal because then-candidate Trump “was very concerned about how this would affect the election” if their allegations of affairs became public before voters cast their ballots.

Federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York have implicated, but not charged, the president in the deals reached in the closing weeks of the 2016 election, alleging in court filings that Cohen acted “in coordination with and at the direction of” Trump.

When asked by a reporter about Cohen’s upcoming testimony during his visit to the southern border on Thursday, Trump said he isn’t concerned.

“I’m not worried about it at all,” he said.

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Author: Weather Internal

Writer. Development student for the awakening of spirit and frequency. 7 years of study on the subjects related to subconscious mind and how it can and will create miracles once the conscious allows you to pass it. Independent journalist with a keen sense for showing the news that your TV won't show! Fighter of truth and justice and believe that ALL people are subject to the same consequences that the law gives no matter your status.

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